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Commons Seminars

Immersion Pathways

pathways

 

 

Propose a Commons iSeminar

Deadline for proposal for Spring 2018: April 28, 2017

 Eligibility

  • Individuals or teams holding academic appointments in one of the four undergraduate schools or the professional schools are eligible. Specific requirements for faculty from the professional schools are detailed below. Instructors on annual contracts are responsible for securing a teaching appointment for the academic year or semester in which they offer the iSeminar in order to be eligible. 
  • Qualified university graduate students or staff professionals who partner with a VU faculty member are eligible. The faculty member must serve as the instructor of record and take an active role in the teaching of the iSeminar. 
  • Since Commons iSeminars are offered by departments or programs in one of the four undergraduate schools, faculty from professional schools must seek an instructional partner within the undergraduate department through which the course is intended to be offered.

 

Requirements for Instructors from Professional Schools without an Undergraduate Division (Nursing, Medicine, Law, Owen, Divinity)

Commons iSeminars cannot be offered through the professional schools. In order for undergraduate students to receive degree credit for iSeminars, they must be offered through a department or program in one of the four undergraduate schools or colleges (Blair School of Music, College of Arts and Science, School of Engineering, Peabody College).

  • Instructors from the professional schools should identify a department or program in one of the undergraduate schools through which to offer the course.
  • The course instructor (or a member of the instructor team) should have an affiliation with the department or program through which the course is to be offered. This affiliation does  not  have to be a formal secondary appointment, but the faculty member should be approved by the department chair as an affiliated faculty member.
  • If none of the course instructors proposing the iSeminars have such an affiliation, they are required to find an instructional partner from within the undergraduate department or program through which the course is to be offered. The level of participation by this instructor will be determined by the teaching team, but the minimum requirement is that this instructor must serve as a guest lecturer or discussion facilitator in at least one session.
  • The instructor/s need to request approval of their Commons iSeminar proposal from the department chair or program director through which the course is to be offered (not from their home department in the professional school).

 

Scope and Content 

Commons iSeminars are one-credit, spring-semester seminars sponsored by the faculties of the university’s undergraduate schools offered through the Office of the Dean of The Ingram Commons. They have no prerequisites and are open to first-year students from any of the four undergraduate colleges or schools. iSeminars are typically capped at fifteen students and meet for the equivalent of fifteen contact hours during the semester in a variety of formats.

The Office of the Dean of The Ingram Commons seeks a wide range of topics that appeal to faculty and students from all disciplines. iSeminars present instructors with the opportunities for team teaching, experimental approaches to instruction, and the creation of unique intellectual experiences not typically offered by a department or school. We encourage, in particular, trans-departmental and trans-institutional teaching teams to submit proposals. iSeminar proposals that are linked to The Commons Reading for the Class of 2021, Strong Inside: Perry Wallace and the Collision of Race and Sports in the South, by Andrew Maraniss—chosen as the Commons reading for a second year in a row—are also welcome. 

 

Compensation

A $2,000 research fund is available to instructors of each iSeminar.

 

iSeminar Curricular Funds

A fund of $500 will be available to each instructor or instructional team to support the educational goals of the iSeminar, e.g., group travel expenses, tickets, special materials for group projects, etc. Whenever possible, you will need to use Vanderbilt's tax-exempt form. Please inquire with Christina Bailey about expense policies and reimbursement procedures before making any purchases.

 

Course Proposals 

One-page proposals should outline the scope and topic(s), questions the iSeminar examines, methods of evaluation, and required text(s) if any. A class-by-class syllabus is not necessary. The iSeminar descriptions from Spring 2017 can serve as models. Instructors are encouraged to write the proposal with first-year students in mind so that, if approved, it can serve as a course description on The Commons website. You are welcome to include your preferred structure and times for teaching the iSeminar. The Office of the Dean of The Ingram Commons will contact you regarding scheduling after the courses have been approved.

 

Scheduling 

Scheduling of iSeminars is flexible. Possibilities include, but are not limited to: 

  • fourteen 50-minute sessions 
  • twelve 60-minute sessions 
  • ten 75-minute sessions
  • eight 90-minute sessions (+ one 50-minute session during the first week of classes) 
  • six 120-minute sessions (+ one 50-minute session during the first week of classes)
  • four 180-minute sessions (+ one 50-minute session during the first week of classes)

All iSeminars should meet during the first week of classes so that students can be introduced to course expectations in order to decide whether or not they want to remain in the course before the end of the add/drop period.

 

Please note the following important dates for Spring Semester 2018: 

Monday, January 8: First Day of Classes
Monday, January 15: Martin Luther King, Jr. Day (classes do not meet)
March 3-11: Spring Break 
April 23: Last Day of Classes 

 

Choosing Time and Day for your Commons iSeminar: 

An ideal time frame for start- and end-times is between 2-7 p.m. This schedule will avoid the heaviest class times on the one end and extra-curricular and House activities on the other. Of course, other times can be arranged, including weekends. iSeminars should start at the regular class times for a given day. Mondays are challenging since no classes are held on Martin Luther King Day (1/15/2018), and iSeminars scheduled after 5 p.m. will reduce the pool of potential female students due to Monday evening sororities meetings. 

 

Assignments and Assessment 

iSeminar instructors should consider reducing reading and writing assignments to a third of a regular 3-credit course. Instructors may also consider other forms of assessment such as creative projects, whether individual or group. While the amount of assignments is limited, the quality of the students’ work should be the same as for a 3-credit course. For specific resources from Vanderbilt’s Center for Teaching on course design and teaching seminars for first-year students, see below.

 

Submission and Approval Process for Proposals

iSeminars will be selected by a faculty committee from within The Ingram Commons. Please request approval for your Commons iSeminar from the chair of the department or program through which it will be offered, then submit your course description, along with a copy of the approval email, to Associate Dean of The Ingram Commons Gregory Melchor-Barz by April 28, 2016. You will be notified by the end of May if your iSeminar has been selected.

 

Center for Teaching Resources 

Teaching First-Year Students; First Day of Class; Team Teaching; DiscussionsCooperative Learning; Classroom Assessment Techniques; Course Design; and Understanding by Design.

 

Inquiries

Further inquiries concerning eligibility, format, scheduling, and other procedures should be directed to Associate Dean Melchor-Barz.

Commons Seminars for the Class of 2020

AADS 1001.01 Capoeira: The African-Brazilian Dance of Deception

ANTH 1001.01 Princes, Wicked Stepmothers, and Good Men: Disney and Gender

BSCI 1001.01 Human Health and Disease: Complex or Complicated?

CMST 1001.02  20th and 21st Century Visual Rhetoric

EDUC 1001.02 Improvisation and Learning

EES 1001.01 Girls Like Dinosaurs Too: Discoveries of Women in Science

ES 1001.03 Electric Power Generation: Energy Choices and Environmental Consequences

EUS 1001.01  Mapping Berlin in the 20th Century 

HIST 1001.01 Digital Microhistory Lab: The Hidden History of 20th Century Fort Negley

ITA 1001.01 Honored Societies: Masons, Mafia, and, Fraternities 

MHS 1001.01 Genes, Disability and Parenthood

NSC 1001.01 The Epigenetics Era: What new Discoveries in Epigenetics Tell us about the Interface of Genes and Environment

NSC 1001.2  ‘How To Develop A Drug For My Grandmother’s Dementia’

SOC 1001.01 Guns: An American Obsession

THTR 1001.01 Choreography as Social Identity in the American Musical

iSeminars for the Class of 2020

CMST 1001.01 Preparing for Immersive Experiences: The Art and Science of Studying Politics

EDUC 1001.01 Preparing for Immersive Experiences: Identity and Audience in Teaching and Learning

ES 1001.01 Preparing for Immersive Experiences: Designing an Immersive Engineering Experience 

ES 1001.02 Preparing for Immersive Experiences: Design through a Critical Lens

HART 1001.01 Preparing for Immersive Experiences: Researching the Built Environment 

HIST 1001.01 Preparing for Immersive Experiences: Merging Science, Technology and the Human 

MUSO 1001.01 Preparing for Immersive Experiences: Creative Expression and the Search for an Authentic Truth

MUSO 1001.02 Preparing for Immersive Experiences: Finding Meaning in the College Jungle

SPAN 1001.01 Preparing for Immersive Experiences: Strategies for a Successful Study Abroad Experience 

SPED 1001.01 Preparing for Immersive Experiences: Encountering Exceptionality